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Nevada Jurisprudence and Prison Report – Vol. 4 no. 3 Summer 2014

Received by Email: Nevada Jurisprudence and Prison Report “Veritas in Caritatis”              Vol. 4, No 3, Summer Issue 2014 THEME: “Audi alterum partem” - Listen to the other side! “Voice of the Nevada Jurisprudence and Prison Report” E-mail:  nvjprudence@gmail.com Website: Nvjprudence.wordpress.com (this issue here) Statement of Purpose: The NJPR Newsletter reports on

Free Radical Movie Night Screening – “30 Frames a Second: The WTO in Seattle” Fri. Oct. 24th

RadicalMovieNightFlyer30FAS Free Radical Movie Night Screening   30 Frames a Second: The WTO in Seattle Fri. Oct. 24th

Oct. 24th Radical Movie Night “30 Frames a Second: The WTO in Seattle

Oct. 24th Radical Movie Night

September’s debut of the Las Vegas Radical Movie Night went well enough that we will now be doing two showings per month. So, on every second and fourth Friday of the month the Sunset Activist Collective (along with Nevada Cop Block and Food Not Bombs Las Vegas) will host a free screening of either a documentary or a movie with significant social value.

The location where Radical Movie Nights will take place is The Sci Fi Center, which many locals already know from its longstanding tradition for showing independent movies and cult classics that are often not available in a large screen setting. (Disclaimer: the Sci Fi Center is not actually involved in the Radical Movie Nights, outside of permitting us to use it as a venue for showing movies.)

In order to coincide with the national Day of Action Against Police Brutality, which is held annually on Oct. 22nd (for more info see: http://www.october22.org/) October’s screenings will involve movies that relate to police abuses. On October 24th we will be showing “30 Frames a Second: The WTO in Seattle” a documentary about the demonstrations during the World Trade Organization meetings in Seattle in 1999 and the police response to those demonstrations. (RSVP on Facebook here)

This film was one of the first to show large scale demonstrations from the perspective of those within the demonstrations. It also was in many cases the first time the average viewer saw uncensored and candid depictions of police tactics toward protesters and the way in which they often incited or even staged incidents within the protests in order to justify arresting and in many cases assaulting even peaceful protesters.

 Free Radical Movie Night Screening   30 Frames a Second: The WTO in Seattle Fri. Oct. 24th

30 Frames a Second: The WTO in Seattle

The level of organization, number of people participating, and type of tactics involved were all beyond what had been seen during any modern protests in the United States. For many years afterwards the “Battle of Seattle,” as it is often referred, was used as a sort of template for demonstrations both by protesters and the police.

About the Movie via Bullfrog Films (http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/30fr.html):

“30 Frames A Second: The WTO in Seattle, is a compelling first-person account of the events that unfolded during the week the World Trade Organization came to Seattle in November of 1999. It’s told from the perspective of 15-year veteran network news cameraman Rustin Thompson, who covered the WTO as an independent journalist. It is the story of how Thompson’s objective point-of-view evolved into a subjective account of what became an unscheduled, unruly outbreak of democracy.

Thompson, who had press credentials for the event, takes the viewer into the fray of tear gas, pepper spray, and police abuse; behind the lines and inside the convention center and press rooms; and along the marches, sit-ins, and demonstrations. His dynamic, up-close footage captures the passion, the confusion, the anger, and the courage of everyone involved, from protesters to police to delegates to bureaucrats.

RadicalMovieNightFlyerP Free Radical Movie Night Screening   30 Frames a Second: The WTO in Seattle Fri. Oct. 24th

Radical Movie Nights: Every 2nd and 4th Friday

With Thompson narrating, the film asks viewers to emotionally engage their own conflicting feelings about the demonstrations and behind-closed-doors meetings. “I was intrigued by taking a singular, personal approach to the events,” says Thompson, as he recounts how the protests affected him as a journalist and a common citizen. The result is an impressionistic journal of a decisive week that exploded into a massive expression of freedom: of speech, of assembly, and the press.”

Awards:

ALA Video Round Table’s 2001 Notable Video for Adults

Chris Award, Columbus International Film Festival

Best Documentary, Portland Festival of World Cinema

Gold Jury Prize, Chicago Underground Film Festival

Best Documentary, Seattle Underground Film Festival

Most Inspirational Short Film, Reel to Real International Film Festival

Taos Talking Picture Festival

Northwest Film and Video Festival

Further Information:

Watch the Trailer: http://youtu.be/K2vOnKyxYik

Check out the director’s website: http://www.whitenoiseproductions.com/

Thanks for reading. Free Radical Movie Night Screening – “30 Frames a Second: The WTO in Seattle” Fri. Oct. 24th is a post from Nevada Cop Block

Oct. 24th Radical Movie Night – "30 Frames a Second: The WTO in Seattle"

October 24th Radical Movie Night
September’s debut of the Las Vegas Radical Movie Night went well enough that we will now be doing two showings per month. So, on every second and fourth Friday of the month the Sunset Activist Collective will host a free screening of either a documentary or a movie with significant social value.

The location where Radical Movie Nights will take place is The Sci Fi Center, which many locals already know from its longstanding tradition for showing independent movies and cult classics that are often not available in a large screen setting. (Disclaimer: the Sci Fi Center is not actually involved in the Radical Movie Nights, outside of permitting us to use it as a venue for showing movies.)

In order to coincide with the national Day of Action Against Police Brutality, which is held annually on Oct. 22nd (for more info see: http://www.october22.org/) October’s screenings will involve movies that relate to police abuses. On October 24th we will be showing “30 Frames a Second: The WTO in Seattle” a documentary about the demonstrations during the World Trade Organization meetings in Seattle in 1999 and the police response to those demonstrations. (RSVP on Facebook here)

This film was one of the first to show large scale demonstrations from the perspective of those within the demonstrations. It also was in many cases the first time the average viewer saw uncensored and candid depictions of police tactics toward protesters and the way in which they often incited or even staged incidents within the protests in order to justify arresting and in many cases assaulting even peaceful protesters.
30 Frames a Second: The WTO in Seattle

The level of organization, number of people participating, and type of tactics involved were all beyond what had been seen during any modern protests in the United States. For many years afterwards the “Battle of Seattle,” as it is often referred, was used as a sort of template for demonstrations both by protesters and the police.

About the Movie via Bullfrog Films (http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/30fr.html):

“30 Frames A Second: The WTO in Seattle, is a compelling first-person account of the events that unfolded during the week the World Trade Organization came to Seattle in November of 1999. It’s told from the perspective of 15-year veteran network news cameraman Rustin Thompson, who covered the WTO as an independent journalist. It is the story of how Thompson’s objective point-of-view evolved into a subjective account of what became an unscheduled, unruly outbreak of democracy.

Thompson, who had press credentials for the event, takes the viewer into the fray of tear gas, pepper spray, and police abuse; behind the lines and inside the convention center and press rooms; and along the marches, sit-ins, and demonstrations. His dynamic, up-close footage captures the passion, the confusion, the anger, and the courage of everyone involved, from protesters to police to delegates to bureaucrats.

Radical Movie Nights: Every 2nd and 4th Friday
With Thompson narrating, the film asks viewers to emotionally engage their own conflicting feelings about the demonstrations and behind-closed-doors meetings. “I was intrigued by taking a singular, personal approach to the events,” says Thompson, as he recounts how the protests affected him as a journalist and a common citizen. The result is an impressionistic journal of a decisive week that exploded into a massive expression of freedom: of speech, of assembly, and the press.”

Awards:

ALA Video Round Table’s 2001 Notable Video for Adults
Chris Award, Columbus International Film Festival
Best Documentary, Portland Festival of World Cinema
Gold Jury Prize, Chicago Underground Film Festival
Best Documentary, Seattle Underground Film Festival
Most Inspirational Short Film, Reel to Real International Film Festival
Taos Talking Picture Festival
Northwest Film and Video Festival

Further Information:
Watch the Trailer: http://youtu.be/K2vOnKyxYik
Check out the director’s website: http://www.whitenoiseproductions.c
om/
 Bookmark and Share
Bookmark and Share

Continue reading at EYEAM4ANARCHY …

The LVMPD Agrees That You Shouldn’t Talk to Them

KnowYourRightsNVCopBlock 240x300 The LVMPD Agrees That You Shouldnt Talk to Them

Know Your Rights and how to protect them when dealing with police.

About a month ago, in early September, I did an interview with Joe Bartels of “8 News Now,” the local CBS affiliate in Las Vegas. Although the actual interview went really well, once it was broadcast it was fairly obvious that the intent of the piece was already set even before Joe talked to me.

That predetermined slant being the nonsense claim that Cop Block promotes violence against cops and has ties to the Millers, a married couple who recently murdered a couple of Las Vegas Metro cops, but had no actual ties or even any evidence that they so much as followed Cop Block. (Their Facebook pages, which were pretty widely viewed after the incident, contained a grand total of two shares from Cop Block going back three months.) In spite of the fact that I pointed out that neither I nor anyone I know had ever met or even heard of the Millers prior to the day they shot those cops and that in doing so they had actually made it more difficult for those of us advocating for accountability in peaceful ways, he chose to leave all that out and just do a very incomplete paraphrasing of my statements about them.

They also left out all of the discussion about downtown and the increase in harassment by cops there or the historically nonexistent accountability that is so prevalent in Las Vegas area police departments, which was presumably the reason for the interview in the first place. However, I got nothing but positive feedback from it and several people came down to First Friday while other Nevada Cop Block members and I were handing out flyers and actually asked for one, stating that they saw the interview. Plus, the headline of the text version was pretty accurate (“‘Cop Block’ advocates for rights when dealing with officers“). It’s also rather funny to hear all of them making sure that they enunciate properly to make sure they didn’t slip up and say something else when they said “Cop Block.”

FirstFridayFlyer 300x282 The LVMPD Agrees That You Shouldnt Talk to Them

Flyering During First Friday in Downtown Las Vegas

Beyond that, that little spinning flyer graphic they made is obviously going to be the opening of all my videos from here on out. Also, as the title of the post states, Metro decided they didn’t want to respond to any of my statements (they held the broadcast back a day in order to talk with a Metro spokesperson), but they did state that they agreed with everything on the flyer, which would presumably include the advice not to speak to cops and to film them. The other thing about this interview that made me rather happy is that it was prompted by someone placing one of our downtown “know your rights” flyers on their news van one day while they were at lunch.

I actually asked everyone that I thought might be out flyering that day and none of them had put it there. Therefore, someone apparently downloaded the file of the flyer that is available here at Nevada Cop Block, printed it off, and went out flyering on their own. I think it is awesome that people are taking advantage of that resource and that people I don’t even actually know are out there spreading the word to protect people from the harassment that has become so commonplace in downtown Las Vegas.

Finally, they also interviewed Stephen Stubbs, a local attorney that does free monthly “Know Your Rights” seminars for Las Vegas area residents, and he confirmed that the flyers contained “sound legal advice.” You may remember Stephen Stubbs from having been arrested for refusing to leave the area after one of his clients had asked for a lawyer during questioning by the LVMPD Gang Unit. He also represents the man who was beaten by Metro cops in a bar downtown because they didn’t think he was walking fast enough.

‘Cop Block’ advocates for rights when dealing… by Copwatch_World-News

Excerpts from the interview:

‘Cop Block’ advocates for rights when dealing with officers

dbc4dc9bf7da8cd9083b7a4cd5386c03 The LVMPD Agrees That You Shouldnt Talk to Them

Know Your Rights!

LAS VEGAS – A group critical of police is warning downtown visitors of what they’re calling police harassment. The group known as ‘Cop Block’ said it feels that police are overstepping their authority, so they want people to know their rights.

Cop Block is a nationwide movement, and their main goal is to be an advocate for individual rights, so the group likes to hand out flyers with  a series of suggestions on how to handle interactions with police authorities…

The group said it’s handing out these flyers because of an increase in run-ins with police and the alleged harassment people see downtown.

“That flyer is basically a ‘know your rights’ flyer. It’s meant to educate people on what their rights are,” Kelly Patterson, a member of the Nevada chapter of Cop Block said.

Patterson said there’s a systemic problem that exists between police and the public.

“I’m advocating for them to be accountable; for them to do reasonable investigations when things appear questionable,” Patterson said…

We reached out to Metro Police, but they didn’t have anyone available to talk about the alleged harassment, or the flyers being handed out downtown.”

A spokesperson did tell us that the department was aware of the flyers and they agree with the information on them. The flyers five suggestions for people to take in consideration when they come into contact with officers consist of:

  1. Record your interaction on camera.
  2. Do not talk to the police or answer questions.
  3. Ask whether you are being detained, if not leave.
  4. Never consent to a search.
  5. Be polite, but firm.

We caught up with Stephen Stubbs, a local attorney, and he said that’s sound legal advice.

“If you want to talk to police, talk to police. The fact is that you don’t have to. The supreme court has said very clearly that you do not have to talk to police,” he said.

Thanks for reading. The LVMPD Agrees That You Shouldn’t Talk to Them is a post from Nevada Cop Block

Asserting Rights at a North Las Vegas DUI Checkpoint

This content was originally shared via CopBlock.org/Submit (you can submit content relating to Nevada directly to Nevada Cop Block via NVCopBlock.org’s own submission page) by a gent who noted:
 Asserting Rights at a North Las Vegas DUI Checkpoint

I went through three DUI checkpoints on the night of this incident, and this is the only one that did not release me immediately upon refusing to answer questions.

I was detained at a DUI checkpoint for refusing to answer their questions, after refusing to answer all questions I was released after nearly six minutes.

Incident Date: 8/30/2013
Individuals Responsible: “sgt.” Cook and unidentified colleague
Outfit: Nevada Highway Patrol
Phone: (702) 486-4100

copblock banner 320x90 cameras Asserting Rights at a North Las Vegas DUI Checkpoint

Click for Cameras / Dashcam suggestions

Text from video description:

8/30/13 22:25. MLK x W Cheyenne ave, North Las Vegas NV. Driver refuses to answer questions, first officer aggravated, calls in NHP Sgt. Cook and proceeds to get an education on the laws surrounding suspicion-less stops/searches.

RELATED CONTENT: CopBlock.org/KnowYourRights

.

Thanks for reading. Asserting Rights at a North Las Vegas DUI Checkpoint is a post from Nevada Cop Block

Food Not Bombs LV Weekly Picnic and Food Sharing – 10/12/14

**Please take note of the location change ** (See below for map)

As of September 28th 2014, Food Not Bombs Las Vegas has begun holding our weekly vegetarian/vegan picnics at Huntridge Circle Park, rather than Baker Park. Baker Park was used as our weekly location for Food Not Bombs Las Vegas meals and other events for over six years, since the closing of Circle Park and served that purpose quite well until recent changes within the park limited the usable space available within the park. Those and various other reasons went into the decision to move back to Huntridge Circle Park.

Food Not Bombs in Las Vegas FoodNotBombsLasVegas.org has been sharing food with hungry people in the Las Vegas area since 2005. During that time, members have often used their own money to cover expenses for necessary food ingredients not received through donations; bowls, plates, utensils, etc. necessary for eating; transportation costs; and other assorted costs associated with providing food with a large group of people on a weekly basis.

In order to provide variety and fill nutritional needs often unmet in typical “soup kitchens,” these meals are either vegetarian or vegan. Also, most of the food served consists of food that otherwise would be thrown out and therefore issues of waste are also addressed by the recovery and preparation of that food for people that need it.

Currently, Food Not Bombs Las Vegas holds two weekly potluck style picnics on Sundays and Mondays, where food is shared with people in need within the Las Vegas area community (the only real requirement is that you are hungry). In addition, members of FNBLV spend time with and advocate for those affected by extreme poverty. Often, people that are homeless or in danger of becoming homeless are looked down upon and harassed by others, especially by members of law enforcement.

In fact, in 2006 when the City of Las Vegas actually made it illegal to feed hungry people, members of Food Not Bombs were themselves cited and even arrested for defying those laws. Therefore, that compassion for and advocacy toward those experiencing financial difficulties is oftentimes as important as the sharing of food itself, especially since Las Vegas is one of the most hard hit areas in almost every economic category during the current recession.

General Information about Food Not Bombs and the Las Vegas Picnics:

Every Sunday from 10:30 am to around noon (there’s no designated end time) and every Monday at 11:30 am, Food Not Bombs Las Vegas holds weekly picnics where members share food with hungry people, address unnecessary waste, and make a statement about non-violence in relation to all living creatures at Huntridge Circle Park, which is located at 1251 S. Maryland Pkwy just south of Charleston Blvd.

These picnics are an event not just a handout or charity action. Members interact with and befriend local people who may be experiencing difficulty making ends meet and are in need of a supplement to their available food resources. We share healthy nutritious vegetarian or vegan meals with them as a way of building community and ensuring those who might be experiencing financial difficulties that they are still valued members of our society.

In addition, anyone wanting to get involved with Food Not Bombs within the Las Vegas area is encouraged to come and talk to current members and explore ways that they can become a part of this organization and/or suggest new ways that we can be a part of the local community. And, of course, if you are hungry and need some food, you are more than welcome to come down and share in what we have available.

Food Not Bombs Las Vegas is a local autonomous branch of an international movement FoodNotBombs.net that for decades has supported sharing, respect, peace, cooperation, dignity, a nurturing of the environment and most of all optimism at a time when many are in despair. We also encourage a “Do It Yourself” feeling of empowerment and a rejection of the need to solve problems through violence including the violence of war, violence of poverty and violence against animals and the earth, as well as humans.

We strive to show that it is not necessary to waste so much of the food that we work so hard to grow by organizing a voluntary system of food recovery and redistribution. No one should need to go hungry when we have so much abundance. Food Not Bombs is not a charity. This energetic all volunteer grassroots movement is active throughout the Americas, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Australia.

For over 30 years the movement has worked to end hunger and has supported actions to stop the globalization of the economy, restrictions to the movements of people, end exploitation and the destruction of the earth and its beings. It is a matter of ending the domination of corporate power and providing access to, and encouraging participation in, the making of decisions that affect our life and future.


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Free Radical Movie Night Screening of “Let the Fire Burn” Oct. 10th

RadicalMovieNightFlyerLTFB Free Radical Movie Night Screening of Let the Fire Burn Oct. 10th

October Radical Movie Night – “Let the Fire Burn”

 Radical Movie Night in Las Vegas

(via KellyWPatterson.com)

September’s debut of the Las Vegas Radical Movie Night went very well. In fact, it went well enough that we will now be doing two showings per month. So, on every second and fourth Friday of the month at 6:00 pm, the Sunset Activist Collective will host a free screening of either a documentary or a movie with significant social value.

The location where Radical Movie Nights take place is The Sci Fi Center, which many locals already know from its longstanding tradition for showing independent movies and cult classics that are often not available in a large screen setting. (Disclaimer: the Sci Fi Center is not actually involved in the Radical Movie Nights, outside of permitting us to use it as a venue for showing movies.)

In order to coincide with the National Day of Action Against Police Brutality, which is held annually on Oct. 22nd (for more info see: http://www.october22.org/) October’s screenings will involve movies that relate to police abuses. On October 10th, we will be showing “Let the Fire Burn” a documentary about the Philadelphia police department’s response to a group known as the MOVE Organization, which was a radical black liberation group that practiced anarcho-primitivism, during two raids in 1978 and 1985.

letthefireburn6 Free Radical Movie Night Screening of Let the Fire Burn Oct. 10th

Delbert Africa is arrested by police after the 1978 gun battle.

This film raises many questions about the tendency of governments and law enforcement to use legitimate complaints as an opportunistic excuse to go after people or groups they dislike and the heavy-handed ways in which they often do so. As the movie shows, the members of MOVE were very bad neighbors and made things difficult for those living around them. However, the Philadelphia Police Department’s “solution” resulted in most of those neighbors losing their homes when a fire ignited by a police bomb burned 61 surrounding buildings. In addition, 11 of the 13 MOVE members living there , including 5 children, were killed by that fire, which was intentionally allowed to burn until it was out of control.

Further, those residents’ and the city’s years long battle over poorly constructed and massively over budget replacement homes highlights the often corrupt and crony driven nature of politics. One might be tempted to ask if they were actually better off with their noisy neighbors. It certainly does beg the question of whether there were many, many better options to resolve the issues.

About the Movie (via: http://LetTheFireBurn.com)

LetTheFireBurn Free Radical Movie Night Screening of Let the Fire Burn Oct. 10th

Let the Fire Burn

“In the astonishingly gripping ‘Let the Fire Burn,’ director Jason Osder has crafted that rarest of cinematic objects: a found-footage film that unfurls with the tension of a great thriller. On May 13, 1985, a longtime feud between the city of Philadelphia and controversial radical urban group MOVE came to a deadly climax. By order of local authorities, police dropped military-grade explosives onto a MOVE-occupied rowhouse. TV cameras captured the conflagration that quickly escalated—and resulted in the tragic deaths of eleven people (including five children) and the destruction of 61 homes. It was only later discovered that authorities decided to ‘…let the fire burn.’ Using only archival news coverage and interviews, first-time filmmaker Osder has brought to life one of the most tumultuous and largely forgotten clashes between government and citizens in modern American history.”

Awards:

Winner – Best Editing in a Documentary Feature – Tribeca Film Festival

Special Jury Mention – Best New Documentary Director – Tribeca Film Festival

Director Jason Osder was named one of the 25 New Faces of Independent Film in Filmmaker Magazine July 2013.

Further Information:

letthefireburn7 Free Radical Movie Night Screening of Let the Fire Burn Oct. 10th

The Aftermath

Watch the Trailer: http://youtu.be/-v5ZXAxTGHg

Check out the official website: http://www.letthefireburn.com/

The website of the MOVE Organization: http://onamove.com/

On Cop Block:

Philadelphia – The City That Bombed Itself: http://www.copblock.org/745/pete-visits-the-city-that-bombed-itself/

Thanks for reading. Free Radical Movie Night Screening of “Let the Fire Burn” Oct. 10th is a post from Nevada Cop Block

Another Case of Police Brutality Inside CCDC by the LVMPD

LVMPDabuseCCDC 300x225 Another Case of Police Brutality Inside CCDC by the LVMPD

Police Brutality at the CCDC

This is a cross post from CopBlock.org: Bridger Kennedy shared the information below via CopBlock.org/Submit about the unwarranted treatment some employed in the Clark County Detention Center used against him. For incidents related to Nevada, you can also submit directly to Nevada Cop Block’s Submit Page.

Date of Incident: September 25th 2014
Individual Responsible: Seargent Newman and colleagues
Outfit: Clark County Detention Center, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department
Phone: (702) 671-3900

Hey, my name is Bridger Kennedy. I was just in jail for a DUI (my own prescription medication) that I had taken four-hours prior to driving and while I was in the Clark County Detention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada I was beat up pretty bad in there by about six correction officers.

Prior to my intake picture my face was pushed up against the wall and my bare feet were stepped on with their boots, then after the picture was taken – both front and sideways being jerked around like a rag doll – fingernails gripped into the inner part of my biceps leaving bruises.

I was then put in this black restraint chair and my hands were handcuffed til the very last notch on the cuff. I was shoved to sit down, my balls kneed on by one of the officers, my ankles were cuffed as tight as possible too, and then put some type of thigh winch strap thing around both my legs – smashing my knees together.

clarkc county detention center las vegas metropolitan police department copblock Another Case of Police Brutality Inside CCDC by the LVMPDI was very mad at this point and was was left in the chair for two hours. I then was taken out and seated in the big intake room (left side guys, right side girls). I was seated in the last row 2nd or 3rd seat to the left, everything was going fine. About 30-minutes had passed by when I had seen people asking to register on the phone so that they could make calls to people outside of the jail on one of the two phones available to do so.

There was one man on the left phone registering and there wasn’t anyone on the right phone, so I asked this African American female correctional officer (CO) if I can please register? She rudely answered with a snotty ‘No’ and turned away from me, at that point I didn’t say anything. About one-minute later a female inmate asks her if she could register and the CO gladly says ‘Yes’ to her, so at this point I said that is messed up why can’t I register and she can? Then this Hispanic CO says “Stand up motherfucker get over here” so I stood up and by the time I was on my feet he was rushing me and grabbed my wrist then threw me to the side.

By this point two other officers were running up and helped him throw me face down onto the ground and kneeing me in the back of the head.

I just had surgery to get my portacath removed two days prior to being in the jail. I have been in remission from cancer for three years now I was diagnosed with non Hodgkin’s lymphoma when I was 17 (I will be 21 on December 28 of this year). I was face down yelling to them I had cancer and just had surgery.

The CO’s came over and piled their weight on top of my chest head arms legs back and feet while I can barely breathe I was yelling I have asthma as well since I was a little kid and now they are yelling to me to stop resisting when I wasn’t resisting whatsoever.

I couldn’t move and inch of any part of my body, at this point I am in excruciating pain and am being lifted up by my wrists and being taken back the the black restraint chair again. I was then once again strapped into the chair as tight as they possibly could after about 45-minutes in the chair. I just couldn’t bare the lack of circulation to my hands and feet. My upper thighs had lost the feeling in them by now, so I power through another hour and about 25-minutes of the chair each time having a spit mask on when I never spit or attempted to once.

They took me out and went and sat back down once again in the same chair I originally was in the first time I sat.

Editors Note: Bridger was encouraged to reach out to those involved with Nevada Cop Block, who have done an excellent job focusing the disinfecting light of transparency on the criminal LVMPD outfit.

Thanks for reading. Another Case of Police Brutality Inside CCDC by the LVMPD is a post from Nevada Cop Block

Oct. 10th Radical Movie Night: Free Screening of "Let the Fire Burn."

October Radical Movie Night - "Let the Fire Burn"

 Next Radical Movie Night Oct. 10th

September's debut of the Las Vegas Radical Movie Night went very well. In fact, it went well enough that we will now be doing two showings per month. So, on every second and fourth Friday of the month at 6:00 pm, the Sunset Activist Collective will host a free screening of either a documentary or a movie with significant social value.

The location where Radical Movie Nights take place is The Sci Fi Center, which many locals already know from its longstanding tradition for showing independent movies and cult classics that are often not available in a large screen setting. (Disclaimer: the Sci Fi Center is not actually involved in the Radical Movie Nights, outside of permitting us to use it as a venue for showing movies.)



In order to coincide with the National Day of Action Against Police Brutality, which is held annually on Oct. 22nd (for more info see: http://www.october22.org/) October's screenings will involve movies that relate to police abuses. On October 10th, we will be showing "Let the Fire Burn" a documentary about the Philadelphia police department's response to a group known as the MOVE Organization, which was a radical black liberation group that practiced anarcho-primitivism, during two raids in 1978 and 1985.

This film raises many questions about the tendency of governments and law enforcement to use
Delbert Africa is arrested by police after the 1978 gun battle.
legitimate complaints as an opportunistic excuse to go after people or groups they dislike and the heavy-handed ways in which they often do so. As the movie shows, the members of MOVE were very bad neighbors and made things difficult for those living around them. However, the Philadelphia Police's "solution" resulted in most of those neighbors losing their homes when a fire ignited by a police bomb burned 61 surrounding buildings. In addition, 11 of the 13 MOVE members living there , including 5 children, were killed by that fire, which was intentionally allowed to burn until it was out of control.

Further, those residents' and the city's years long battle over poorly constructed and massively over budget replacement homes highlights the often corrupt and crony driven nature of politics. One might be tempted to ask if they were actually better off with their noisy neighbors. It certainly does beg the question of whether there were many, many better options to resolve the issues.

About the Movie (via: http://LetTheFireBurn.com)

"In the astonishingly gripping 'Let the Fire Burn,' director Jason Osder has crafted that rarest of
Let the Fire Burn
cinematic objects: a found-footage film that unfurls with the tension of a great thriller. On May 13, 1985, a longtime feud between the city of Philadelphia and controversial radical urban group MOVE came to a deadly climax. By order of local authorities, police dropped military-grade explosives onto a MOVE-occupied rowhouse. TV cameras captured the conflagration that quickly escalated—and resulted in the tragic deaths of eleven people (including five children) and the destruction of 61 homes. It was only later discovered that authorities decided to '...let the fire burn.' Using only archival news coverage and interviews, first-time filmmaker Osder has brought to life one of the most tumultuous and largely forgotten clashes between government and citizens in modern American history."

Awards:

Winner - Best Editing in a Documentary Feature - Tribeca Film Festival

Special Jury Mention - Best New Documentary Director - Tribeca Film Festival

Director Jason Osder was named one of the 25 New Faces of Independent Film in Filmmaker Magazine July 2013.


Further Information:
The Aftermath

Watch the Trailer: http://youtu.be/-v5ZXAxTGHg

Check out the official website: http://www.letthefireburn.com/
Philadelphia - The City That Bombed Itself: http://www.copblock.org/745/pete-visits-the-city-that-bombed-itself/
The website of the MOVE Organization: http://onamove.com/
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Food Not Bombs LV Weekly Picnic and Food Sharing – 10/5/14

**Please take note of the location change ** (See below for map)

As of September 28th 2014, Food Not Bombs Las Vegas has begun holding our weekly vegetarian/vegan picnics at Huntridge Circle Park, rather than Baker Park. Baker Park was used as our weekly location for Food Not Bombs Las Vegas meals and other events for over six years, since the closing of Circle Park and served that purpose quite well until recent changes within the park limited the usable space available within the park. Those and various other reasons went into the decision to move back to Huntridge Circle Park.

Food Not Bombs in Las Vegas FoodNotBombsLasVegas.org has been sharing food with hungry people in the Las Vegas area since 2005. During that time, members have often used their own money to cover expenses for necessary food ingredients not received through donations; bowls, plates, utensils, etc. necessary for eating; transportation costs; and other assorted costs associated with providing food with a large group of people on a weekly basis.

In order to provide variety and fill nutritional needs often unmet in typical “soup kitchens,” these meals are either vegetarian or vegan. Also, most of the food served consists of food that otherwise would be thrown out and therefore issues of waste are also addressed by the recovery and preparation of that food for people that need it.

Currently, Food Not Bombs Las Vegas holds two weekly potluck style picnics on Sundays and Mondays, where food is shared with people in need within the Las Vegas area community (the only real requirement is that you are hungry). In addition, members of FNBLV spend time with and advocate for those affected by extreme poverty. Often, people that are homeless or in danger of becoming homeless are looked down upon and harassed by others, especially by members of law enforcement.

In fact, in 2006 when the City of Las Vegas actually made it illegal to feed hungry people, members of Food Not Bombs were themselves cited and even arrested for defying those laws. Therefore, that compassion for and advocacy toward those experiencing financial difficulties is oftentimes as important as the sharing of food itself, especially since Las Vegas is one of the most hard hit areas in almost every economic category during the current recession.

General Information about Food Not Bombs and the Las Vegas Picnics:

Every Sunday from 10:30 am to around noon (there’s no designated end time) and every Monday at 11:30 am, Food Not Bombs Las Vegas holds weekly picnics where members share food with hungry people, address unnecessary waste, and make a statement about non-violence in relation to all living creatures at Huntridge Circle Park, which is located at 1251 S. Maryland Pkwy just south of Charleston Blvd.

These picnics are an event not just a handout or charity action. Members interact with and befriend local people who may be experiencing difficulty making ends meet and are in need of a supplement to their available food resources. We share healthy nutritious vegetarian or vegan meals with them as a way of building community and ensuring those who might be experiencing financial difficulties that they are still valued members of our society.

In addition, anyone wanting to get involved with Food Not Bombs within the Las Vegas area is encouraged to come and talk to current members and explore ways that they can become a part of this organization and/or suggest new ways that we can be a part of the local community. And, of course, if you are hungry and need some food, you are more than welcome to come down and share in what we have available.

Food Not Bombs Las Vegas is a local autonomous branch of an international movement FoodNotBombs.net that for decades has supported sharing, respect, peace, cooperation, dignity, a nurturing of the environment and most of all optimism at a time when many are in despair. We also encourage a “Do It Yourself” feeling of empowerment and a rejection of the need to solve problems through violence including the violence of war, violence of poverty and violence against animals and the earth, as well as humans.

We strive to show that it is not necessary to waste so much of the food that we work so hard to grow by organizing a voluntary system of food recovery and redistribution. No one should need to go hungry when we have so much abundance. Food Not Bombs is not a charity. This energetic all volunteer grassroots movement is active throughout the Americas, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Australia.

For over 30 years the movement has worked to end hunger and has supported actions to stop the globalization of the economy, restrictions to the movements of people, end exploitation and the destruction of the earth and its beings. It is a matter of ending the domination of corporate power and providing access to, and encouraging participation in, the making of decisions that affect our life and future.


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